Tag Archives: blogging

Brilliant, Who Moi?

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The very kind Orange Jammies bestowed me with a blog award. Thankee, thankee! *Bows/curtsies* :)

The point is to carry on the tag, so here goes…

The Brilliant Weblog award is a prize given to sites and blogs that are smart and brilliant both in their content and their design. The purpose of the prize is to promote as many blogs as possible in the blogosphere.

The Rules of the Award say:

  • When you receive the prize you must write a post showing it, together with the name of who has given it to you, and link them back.
  • Choose a minimum of 7 blogs (or even more) that you find brilliant in their content or design.
  • Show their names and links and leave them a comment informing they were prized with the Brilliant Weblog Award.
  • Show a picture of those who awarded you and those you give the prize (optional).
  • And then we pass it on!

1. Maceo Cabrera Estévez — A beautiful, spiritual, poetic blog full of life and beauty. Maceo’s blog is like a balm — whenever I head there and see a new post at the top, my heart smiles even before reading it.

2. Nury Vittachi — The amazing humour columnist whose steroids I really want to get on. How can he do every day what I agonize over doing once a week?!

3. Kenny Mah — First up, for beautiful blog design, and then, for beautiful words. Kenny has such a knack for turning the mundane into the magical. A simple meal becomes a visual sonnet with his camera, a daydream turns into gorgeous prose. One of my favourite writer-friends/friend-writers (what comes first — writing or friendship? Maybe a post on that some other time, because I have thought about it in the past).

4. Krish Ashok — ‘Nuff said, I think. Not an unfamiliar name in the Indian blogosphere by any stretch. Madras humour at its best!

5. Michael Mata — Futuristic poet and artist. I think Michael Mata is a movement all on his own.

6. Sathya Narain — A gem of a Madras Week find (that’s not where we met but that’s how I “met” his writing). Funny, insightful, surprising. Read this!

7. Katia Dmitrieva — Girl comes to India. Falls in love with country and in lust with one or two fine local specimens. Leaves, writes about Eastern Experience and gets famous. Well, Katia is not this cliché, but I hope she gets a book deal anyway (and moves back to Chennai, in further defiance of the stereotype). Not least because of some marvellous misadventures which absolutely must be recorded! ;)

8. Thursday Love — I’ve already blogged about her, but she has hands-down the best sex and relationships blog I’ve ever read, and she’s only just gotten started (and trust me, she has a lot more up her sleeve). If you must only read one post, make it this one.

Okay people, pass on the link love! :)

Mae West & Madras

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No connection between the two (although I would be thrilled to bits if I could be the Mae West of Madras). It’s just that it was Mae West’s birthday today, and you should check out this interview of her. She was 83 at the time it was filmed (about four years before she died)! I love Mae West for many many things, and outliving the bad-girl-tragic-short-life archetype is one of them.

Speaking of bad girl writers, Thursday Love is pretty good. You throw a stone in the blogosphere, you inevitably hit a Carrie Sadshaw. But she’s different — not only does she actually write well and entertainingly, but I know her in real life and she’s one of the rare few who actually walk the walk more than they talk the talk.

And lastly and mostest mostest importantly, Madras Week starts tomorrow. TOMORROW!!! Hope to see some of you delurking. Remember that the open mics are open to all AND I am quite happy to read or find someone else to read any theme-appropriate pieces you email in to me, if you can’t make it.

We put up the exhibit today, and as I type this, some folks are still at Vanilla Place getting things ready. A few of my photos are also on sale, and if anyone actually buys them, please let me know. I’d like to know who the person behind such poor taste is. :)

Measuring Desire

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I came across this fascinating found art project, Lovelines. The idea is to gather random information from blogs and other personal Internet sources, and place them on a scale between love and hate. The information in question relates to statements having to do with varying degrees of love and hate, pared down to the crucial. Updated every few minutes, the visitor gets to take the pulse of what people out there in the cybersphere are sharing at the time about their wants, needs, repulsions, hopes.

Like the addictive, often profound, Postsecret, these decontextualized statements have an interesting effect. For instance, I dragged the heart to “hate” and found: “I hate dates to a degree but in a sense am made up entirely of dates”, posted by a female. Immediately, I wondered, was that the confession of somebody whose social calendar is filled with what others’ expected her to do, or the musings of someone addicted to serial monogamy in a really masochistic way?

Neither, as it turned out. The person really was talking about dates. As in time.

There’s something very voyeuristic about the whole project. I think the trick is to not click through and find out what the rest of any statement means, just as I would personally not want to meet the person behind a postcard at PS. The pathos is in the blanks, in what the imagination comes up with. Seems like a great tool for those who use writing prompts.

Before publishing this post, I went back to drag the heart (you’ll see, when you get there) one more time.

“I love this whip,” wrote a male, three minutes ago.

Hmm.

Blogging on Red Room

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I just cross-posted the previous entry on Red Room, a very interesting new website which describes itself as follows: “Welcome to Red Room, the official home of the world’s greatest writers. Through original, author-generated content, we offer a trustworthy and creative social network unlike any other. Here, you can connect with your favorite authors, access current industry news, and comment on engaging features. By fostering true community between authors and readers, Red Room showcases esteemed writers and inspires the next generation. We also give back to the community we aim to nurture with our commitment to the Causes We Support.”

I first heard about Red Room a few days ago (via whose blog, I can’t remember — but thank you!), and applied to be one of their authors, just trying my luck. I was surprised and honoured to learn that I have been accepted. Some of my favourite authors, including Amy Tan and Salman Rushdie, are involved as well. My page is here, but it is not up yet. Hopefully they’ll approve it, now that I’ve made a submission and added some other content. (Update — it’s up.)

Speaking of writing communities, someone asked me to share more about what happened last night. It was a small event at Eric Miller and Magdalene Jeyarathnam’s home, with special guests New Yorkers Bob Holman of the Bowery Poetry Club, Ram Devineni of Rattapallax Press and language conservationist Catherine Fletcher — as well as members of the local fishing community whose storytelling and oral narrative techniques were shared and discussed. Translations by the sportingly irrepressible Meena Kandasamy, a bit of folk singing from her father, and a debate about whether or not it would be appropriate to have mourning songs sung in a home with a baby livened proceedings up considerably. A personal moment I am proud of was when Bob asked me to perform a poem from memory impromptu in front a video camera, and I did “Witchery”, the opening poem from the book, and a few lines into in, all other conversations in the room had ceased. “You stopped time, you stopped the room,” said Bob. By the end of the evening, I felt very stimulated, very certain that what I’m trying to do in Chennai makes more sense now than ever before, that something is about to spark.

Migration

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And now, I’m here.

After quite some time of being unhappy with the bugs in the old template, wanting a more website-like format and a few other issues, I’ve finally made the move. I like the cleaner look, more user-friendly layout, and not least of all the security options.

So am migrating slowly. Slowly.

I do miss that yellow ochre, though.